2014 Town Hall Action Plan

Process for making comments and suggestions for the Action Plan: The Action Plan below is organized into 10 areas. Please feel free to add to the content of each with additional suggestions either through the survey or by sending your action items to info@350sacramento.org.

Your suggestions should address all three areas: Challenge, Action, Responsibilities. You may request that others add to your suggestion, or add to existing suggestions or offer modifications to any items already in the draft Plan. There is no limit to the number of actions in the draft Plan; the final Action Plan will contain those items identified as highest priority in each area.

BEHAVIOR CHANGE

Challenge:
Action:
Responsible parties (suggested):

BIODIVERSITY

Challenge: Wildlife and the habitats they depend on will be increasingly stressed by climate change. Sensitive species may become rarer and common species threatened. Areas preserved for wildlife conservation may not be as effective for this purpose in the future.
Action: Identify all sensitive species and their habitats in the Sacramento region and document stresses due to climate change and recommendations to ensure their long-term conservation. Prioritize actions needed and draft a plan to implement. List existing legislation, regulations, policies, and funding sources that can be used for this purpose.
Responsible parties (suggested):State, Federal, and local agencies. Environmental organizations such as Friends of Sutter’s Landing, Save the American River Association, Friends of the Swainson’s Hawk, and others.

Challenge:
Action:
Responsible parties (suggested):

ECONOMICS

Challenge: Fossil fuel companies profit from oil and gas extraction without having to pay for the carbon emission pollution it causes.
Action: Divest city and county pensions from fossil fuel companies.
Responsible parties (suggested): City, County, CalPERS, city and county unions, GoFossilFree.org

Challenge: Over half of the exchanges in our region consist of sending and receiving money or goods thousands of miles away, creating huge carbon emissions for the transport of goods such long distance, and draining our economy of resources that could be utilized here.
Solution: Create a local currency, and also a vibrant barter and sharing system for the Sacramento region.  Tools, extra garden produce, vehicles, kitchen gadgets, books, computers, and many other items can be shared with citizen “libraries.”  The cities and counties can sponsor Giveaway days where people bring unwanted items to share and obtain items from others, for a very minimal entry fee. Davis Dollars can help citizens here across the causeway to create the Sacramento Region currency. The Chico Barter network can help our region to create a successful barter system.
Responsible parties (suggested): Cities and counties in the region, Chico Barter Network, Davis Dollars, citizens interested in localizing economies.

Challenge:
Solution:
Responsible parties (suggested):

ENERGY

Challenge: City requires that sidewalks be completely replaced when there are (often minor) irregularities, although manufacturing concrete generates a great amount of CO2.
Action: Repair, rather than replace, sidewalk whenever possible. Grinding will work in many situations—the City should have a grinder available for sidewalk repair and this should be allowed by ordinance. It will also be less expensive for homeowners.
Responsible parties (suggested): City of Sacramento

Challenge: Fracking is an extreme oil and gas extraction technique that contributes a large amount of GHG emissions because methane is released during the drilling process and because more fossil fuels are taken out of the ground to burn and release GHG. In addition, fracking poisons water, which will be in shorter supply due to climate change.
Action: Ban fracking in Sacramento city and county. Ban the release of any water used in connection with fracking to any water supply for Sacramento.
Responsible parties (suggested): City, County, 350Sacramento, Credo Action, Center for Biological Diversity, Food and Water watch, CA against Fracking (CAF)

Challenge: Even electricity generated by alternative energies has a carbon footprint because the alternative apparatuses are made from special metals and raw materials that must be mined and transported, often long distances. The volumes of raw materials needed to supply 7.2 billion people with alternative-energy electricity would be vast. Therefore, even alternative energy use does not get us closer to our goal of 350 ppm of CO2; in fact, every alternative energy apparatus built gets us farther from 350 ppm, as its creation and transport puts more CO2 into the air. The only realistic way we will return to 350 ppm again is for the vast majority of people to live without electricity (including batteries) again. Citizens need support for this transition back to a simpler life.
Action: Cities and counties and interested, knowledgeable citizens provide classes to the public on solar dehydration of food, root cellaring, candlemaking, food preservation by fermentation, solar cooker use, passive solar heating of buildings and water, passive cooling of buildings, insulation of buildings with “waste” materials such as rice hulls, discarded fabric, etc., living safely with candles. Cities can waive building permit fees for people remodeling their homes or businesses with passive solar designs.  Cities can give a small discount on the utility bill, counties can provide a property tax rebate, and state and federal agencies can provide income tax rebates for households and businesses living and working without electricity.
Responsible parties (suggested): Cities and counties of the region, interested citizens, state and federal tax agencies.

Challenge:
Solution:
Responsible parties (suggested):

Challenge:
Action:
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FOOD

Challenge: Current city ordinance says we can’t grow food in commercial zones. If food were grown closer to the population center, less fossil fuel would be used transporting it.
Action: Write a new ordinance to allow food to be grown in commercial zones
Responsible parties (suggested): Sacramentans for Sustainable Community Agriculture (SSCA), Ubuntu Green, Soil Born Farms, Alchemist Community Development Corporation and others are working on this

Challenge: Most food grown in our region is annual plants that are hard on the soil, taking out vast nutrients each season that are not replaced, and requiring much tilling/disking of the land for land preparation, planting, weeding, and harvesting.   Our current agricultural practice of emphasizing annual plants contributes to rise in CO2 in two ways; first, from the fossil fuels needed to power large farming machines at each stage of production; and second, from the breakdown of the carbon matrix in the soil and its exposure to the air from continual tilling, which oxidizes vast amounts of soil carbon, and turning it into CO2.  A vicious cycle has been created, where the soil is becoming less and less fertile from overworking it, breaking the carbon latticework, and continually stripping nutrients, which encourages more weed growth, which then necessitates more disking and chemical use.  Healthy soil stores carbon better; unhealthy soil oxidizes carbon more.
Action: Counties with large amounts of farmland can host farmers and ranchers who are successfully implementing methods to sequester carbon in the soil to give workshops to spread knowledge about more sustainable farming.   (The successful carbon-sequesterers are those farmers/ranchers who are growing perennial crops suited to this region, who use real compost rather than chemicals to fertilize, and who are using animals rather than machines to mow, weed, prune, and fertilize.)   The federal government can stop subsidizing farmers who grow grains, corn, and soy —  and instead begin to subsidize farmers who grow perennials, use real compost, and who have cut down on their machine use by incorporating animals into the orchards and vegetable fields (HA, good luck with that).  Local jurisdictions can cease burning green waste as most now do, and begin to compost it and return it to the farmland where it belongs, to help keep the soil healthy.  Local jurisdictions can implement compost of all kitchen waste with the same purpose; returning it to the farmland where it belongs.
Responsible parties (suggested): Soil Born Farm, Chaffin Family Farm, the Savory Institute, and many other farmers, plus county farm bureaus, other farming organizations, federal farm agencies.

Challenge: There is no place for people, especially apartment dwellers, to put compost. Compost is valuable to enrich gardens.
Action: City could provide a compost service to be picked up (separately) with the trash.
Responsible parties (suggested): City

Challenge:
Action:
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HEALTH

Challenge:
Action:
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LAND USE

Challenge: Sprawl increases CO2 as residents dependent on cars for transportation and often have long commutes in single occupancy vehicles Action: Tax incentives for infill development and development built adjacent to existing light rail lines
Responsible parties (suggested): City, County, 350Sacramento, Ecos land use committee, builders & architects ( e.g. Mogavero)

Challenge:
Action:
Responsible parties
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SOCIAL/ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE

Challenge:
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TRANSPORTATION

Challenge: Twice each day parents drive their students to and from school, resulting in increased carbon from driving and idling, and serious safety issues.
Action: Walking/bicycling caravans where families coordinate and pick up children along the way. Added benefits include exercise for children (and adults) who participate, social networking opportunities, which can strengthen neighborhoods
Responsible parties (suggested): Organized by each school (with assistance from Walk Sacramento, SABA, Kidical Mass)

Challenge: Gap between public transportation and destinations
Action: Educate about first mile/last mile and making it safer for people to bike and walk the last stretch to their destination. Making it safer includes having crosswalks at every bus stop, etc. Bike sharing—you have a membership then can borrow a bike for a few hours or less and return to a bike lot when finished. Lots will be located at Amtrak, RT stations, colleges, the capitol, midtown.
Responsible parties (suggested): City of Sacramento, SABA, Colleges, RT, Amtrak, Yolobus

Challenge: Not enough space for bikes on buses, light rail, and trains
Action: Make it a priority to accommodate bikes on all public transportation modalities.
Responsible parties (suggested): RT, City of Sacramento, SABA, Bike Kitchen, colleges, Amtrak, Yolobus

Challenge: Not enough people view public transportation as an option for play as well as work and school.
Action: Add time to and from your weekend trips to take the bus to your fun destination. More fun? Make it a group trip! Add friends to the group and make specific outings to take Regional Transit. Especially try to add people who have never ridden transit before, to your group.
Responsible parties (suggested): The community!

Challenge:
Action:
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WATER

Challenge: Warmer temperatures means increased evaporation, and greater water use by people, plants and animals.
Action: Reduce wasteful use and carbon footprint of urban water demands by replacing lawns with native plants and urban agriculture.
Responsible parties (suggested): Local water agencies; California Native Plant Society; Ubuntu Green and other urban agricultural efforts; homeowners

Challenge:
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Resources:

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